Category:

Telemedicine law and telehealth law is driven at the federal level, but mostly at the state level, since the developing areas of law are more dynamic at the state level than they are at the federal level.  For instance, the Florida Telehealth Advisory Council is recommending that telehealth capabilities be expanded and that insurance reimbursement for telehealth services be compelled.  If the Council’s recommendations are adopted by Florida legislators, it will be the most forward moving telehealth law in the country.

We are committed to advising teleheatlh providers and telemedicine providers and related telehealth vendors of all kinds, both within Florida and around the country.  Given our extensive experience and exclusive focus on healthcare law, we see where healthcare is headed; and we are working closely with many around the country who have caught the wave of telehealth.

House and Senate Agree on New Florida Telehealth Bill

May 7th, 2019 by

florida telehealth lawMonday, April 29, 2019, the Florida House and Senate came to agreement on a new Telehealth bill (HB 23). If signed by Governor DeSantis, the bill will become effective July 1, 2019.

The bill creates two new statutes: Section 456.47 and Section 627.42396, and amends Section 641.31.

Telehealth Services

Section 456.47 sets forth the standards of practice for telehealth providers, authorizes the use of telehealth encounters for patient evaluations, and allows certain providers to prescribe certain controlled substances in limited circumstances. The bill also allows non-physician providers to use telehealth without being deemed to be practicing medicine without a license. Further, the bill sets forth record keeping requirements and registration for out-of-state telehealth providers. It authorizes the Department of Health to establish rules for telehealth, including exemptions from registration requirements, and to set up disciplinary action against telehealth providers that violate the law or rules. read more

$1.2B Health Care Fraud Schemes Involving Telemedicine and Durable Medical Equipment Marketing Executives

April 9th, 2019 by

Via justice.gov – One of the largest health care fraud schemes investigated by the FBI and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General (HHS-OIG) and prosecuted by the Department of Justice resulted in charges against 24 defendants, including the CEOs, COOs and others associated with five telemedicine companies, the owners of dozens of durable medical equipment (DME) companies and three licensed medical professionals, for their alleged participation in health care fraud schemes involving more than $1.2 billion in loss, as well as the execution of over 80 search warrants in 17 federal districts.  In addition, the Center for Medicare Services, Center for Program Integrity (CMS/CPI) announced today that it took adverse administrative action against 130 DME companies that had submitted over $1.7 billion in claims and were paid over $900 million. Read on…

Prescribing Controlled Substances via Telehealth under Florida and Federal Law

January 15th, 2019 by

controlled substances via telehealthBy: Susan St. John

Pursuant to Section 456.44(3)(a), Florida Statutes, and Rule 64B-9.013(3)(a), Florida Administrative Code, a practitioner must evaluate a patient by taking a complete medical history and performing a physical examination prior to prescribing a controlled substance to a patient. The aforementioned statute and rule do not specifically rule out a patient evaluation taking place via a telemedicine visit. However, under current Florida law, only controlled substances used to treat psychiatric disorders may be prescribed using telemedicine technology, that is audio and video technology commonly referred to as telepsychiatry. Specifically, Rule 64B8-9.0141(4) states, “controlled substances shall not be prescribed through the use of telemedicine except for the treatment of psychiatric disorders.” Psychiatric disorders include Substance Use Disorders since the DSM-V classifies addiction as a mental health condition. Although the Standards for Telemedicine Practice under Rule 64B-9.0141, Florida Administrative Code, allows licensed practitioners to prescribe controlled substances for psychiatric disorders via telehealth technology, the federal law has lagged somewhat behind. read more

CMS Releases New mHealth Codes for 2019

January 15th, 2019 by

mHealth codes 2019 CMSBy: Amanda Bhikhari

Improving patient outcomes while maintaining physician decision making and practice efficiency is key to success in the growing health care arena. Innovation is the ability to see change as an opportunity to create new value, instead of a threat to what we find comfortable. It is clear that the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is embracing the importance of innovation in the way we deliver health care.

In November 2018, the 2019 Physician Fee Schedule and Quality Payment Program was released by CMS with changes effective January 1, 2019.  This is the time for providers to definitely keep their eyes open to utilizing mHealth, and telehealth services. mHealth is also known as mobile health, and is a general term for the use of mobile phones and other wireless technology in medical care to educate consumers about preventive healthcare services as well as for disease surveillance, chronic disease management, treatment support, epidemic outbreak tracking. The release of the program is a sign that the agency is in favor of expanding the implementation of technology in providing medical care.  The updated mHealth codes are: read more

Prescribing & Dispensing Controlled Substances: Legal Update

June 5th, 2018 by

dispensing controlled substancesBy: Michael Silverman

A new law has been passed in Florida that pertains to prescribing and dispensing controlled substances. On March 19, 2018 Governor Scott signed HB21, which becomes effective July 1, 2018. Intended to address the growing nationwide opioid epidemic that has also greatly affected Floridians, among other requirements, the new regulations establish: read more

Telemedicine Contracts: Non Compete Agreements

March 9th, 2018 by

telemedicine lawBy: Karina Gonzalez

Healthcare practitioners are excited about the expansive geographic scope of practice in Telemedicine.  A licensed Florida physician can provide services in other states provided the physician is also licensed in the state where the patient is receiving the services. There are no geographical limitations if the delivery platform of technology provides voice and vision and where necessary videos for the Telemedicine/Telehealth visit.

As more and more physicians practice and contract to provide Telemedicine visits, one of the legal challenges we are facing is how to draft a restrictive covenant. The traditional reasonableness standards used to evaluate non-compete agreements just do not apply. What are you trying to restrict when the physician lives in Florida but has telemedicine practice with patients 500 miles away? read more

Telehealth Law Florida: Delivery System for Substance Abuse Services

January 9th, 2018 by

telemedicine lawBy: Karina Gonzalez

Telehealth law Florida is constantly evolving The latest example is found with Florida’s Department of Children and Families (DCF) recent proposed rule change which now includes a definition of Telehealth as a delivery system in substance abuse.  Telehealth can be used in treatment or prevention services through electronic communications from one site to another.  However, it does not include delivery of services using only the audio on a telephone, or e-mails, text messages, fax transmissions, US mail or other parcel service. Proposed Rule 65D-30.0031 (83) Definitions.

Telehealth services can be used in intensive outpatient, day or night treatment, day or night treatment with community housing, outpatient, interventions, aftercare, and prevention.   If a substance abuse provider plans on including telehealth services it must submit to DCF detailed procedures outlining which services it intends to provide. The provider will be responsible for the quality of the equipment and technology used in the telehealth service. Proposed Rule 65D-30.004 (20) Common Licensing Standards. read more

Telehealth Contract Review: How to Vet a Telehealth Opportunity

October 12th, 2017 by

telemedicine contractBy: Susan St. John

So you’ve been approached by a telehealth company to provide telehealth services to patients. What do you do next about this telehealth contract opportunity? Providing these services can be an opportunity to assist patients who cannot make it to a physician’s or practitioner’s office, and it’s an opportunity for a potential source of income. However, before you sign on the telehealth contract’s dotted line, you need to do a little background checking, a little investigation, to ensure the telehealth company you sign with is compliant with state and federal laws for providing telehealth services. In other words, perform due diligence in determining if this is the telehealth company for you.

So what should you look for in a telehealth company as a physician or practitioner presented with a telehealth contract? read more

Telehealth Practice Setup: 3 Easy Tech Steps

October 11th, 2017 by

telemedicine practiceBy: Frank Diaz, Guest Contributor

Floridians are all too familiar with the business and logistical hurdles bad tropical weather can create. However, even less expected are the everyday human errors such as an overzealous backhoe operator digging above a fiber optic cable and inadvertently cutting a data connection. The reality is that disruption can happen anytime, not just during hurricane season. The good news is that recent developments in technology provide a new way to both augment the practice of medicine and insulate a business against downtime. Telemedicine or telehealth is rapidly becoming an inexpensive and secure way to interact with patients and medical professionals just short of the tactile response from pressing flesh during an introductory handshake.

Granted, telemedicine and telehealth are generic terms that incorporate layers of many technologies. For simplicity’s sake we’ll discuss some of the most popular options for video conferencing, cloud based technology and virtualization. If that sounds intimidating just look past the buzzwords you may hear in commercials mentioning a certain character from a Sir Arthur Conan Doyle novel. It’s all elementary. See what I did there?
read more

Medicare Telehealth Basics

October 9th, 2017 by

Medicare TelemedicineBy: Susan St. John

If you are having issues with Medicare telehealth claim matters then you want to hire an experienced legal team that can guide you through the process, ensuring the best possible outcome. You also have the benefit of knowing that you are getting the best counsel for any legal matters and do not have to rely on amateur advisement like blogs and forums. These are some of the questions you can get answers to:

  • What experience do you have? When you hire an attorney to handle a legal matter for your business, you want them to be experienced and have a well established presence in this industry because there’s a chance they will be going up against insurance companies who have a lot of money and an experienced team of their own.
  • How can you help me with this situation? When you are dealing with this matter you want to make sure that everything is taken under consideration. For example, are you compliant with all the rules and regulations, new changes in policy or anything else that comes up? Do you have all the licensing you need to conduct business and so forth? An experienced team will make sure you have everything you need to move forward.
  • How can you help me in the future? One of the biggest advantages of hiring a law firm rather than an individual attorney is that we can assist you with several legal matters that come up in the future. Today you may need assistance with a contract for hiring a new doctor but a year from now it may be to purchase or sell a practice.

With the rise in services provided to patients via telehealth entities, it is important that both practitioners and patients understand what criteria must be met in order to provide and bill telehealth on behalf of Medicare patients. Here are a few of the basics.

First, “telehealth service” for Medicare purposes means “professional consultations, office visits, and office psychiatry services, and any additional service specified by the Secretary. To be eligible for payment, telehealth services must be rendered to an eligible individual, that is, an individual enrolled in Medicare, who receives telehealth services at an originating site from a physician or practitioner at a distant site via telehealth communications system. An eligible individual does not need to be presented by a physician or practitioner at the originating site to a physician or practitioner at a distant site, unless it is medically necessary. Determination of whether a presenting physician or practitioner is necessary at the originating site is made by the physician or practitioner at the distant site.

So, what is an originating site and what is a distant site? read more