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3 Ways a Florida Medical License Attorney Can Save Your Practice

April 9th, 2021 by

Chances are, you hope you’ll never need the help of a Florida medical license lawyer. You just want to serve your patients with dignity and honor, without ever taking a break to deal with a lawsuit or legal complaint.

Unfortunately, even with the best Florida physician malpractice insurance program available, you may need legal help to save your business.

Here are just three ways in which a Florida medical license lawyer could help you:

1. Prevent Common Problems

Medical errors are unfortunately common. More than 250,000 deaths due to medical errors happen in the United States each year. Some aren’t preventable, but others are.

You may experience moments of uncertainty, where a choice could cause an error. A Florida medical license attorney might help if you’re dealing with:

  • Contract issues. Are you working long hours with no breaks? Is a lack of sleep impacting your work?
  • Interpersonal problems. Is workplace harassment impacting your ability to care for patients?
  • Licensing concerns. Are you able to attend continuing education classes to stay abreast of the latest developments?

Addressing any of these issues could keep common malpractice issues from occurring.

2. Represent Your Interests in Court

If you are facing a case, you’ll need a Florida medical license attorney more than ever. The consequences can be severe.

For example, one Florida pharmacist faced penalties of up to 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. A lawyer could help defend you in a case like this and ensure you’re not punished for something you just didn’t do.

3. Clear Your Name

Plenty of websites allow consumers to search for malpractice claims against doctors. Presumably, the sites allow these patients to get better, safer care. As a doctor, they can ruin your reputation.

A talented medical license lawyer can work hard to defend your good name, so a frivolous lawsuit won’t stall your practice for a lifetime.

At Florida Healthcare Law Firm, we have a team of talented lawyers waiting to help you. Contact us to find out more.

A Quick Refresher On Medicare’s Requirements For Self-Reporting & Returning Overpayments

April 8th, 2021 by

By: Zach Simpson

With the current healthcare environment many providers looked to alternative methods of treating patients and achieving outcomes this past year due to the pandemic. To meet the needs of their patients, and their financial obligations many providers implemented services that were not customary to their practice, or their billing departments. As is the case for any office that begins to provide something new there is always the potential for error in any aspect of the practice involved with the patient or claim. Therefore, I believe it is a great time to refresh providers on the procedures for reporting and returning Medicare overpayments as they are discovered moving forward.

As many of you are aware in 2016 the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published a final rue pursuant to Section 1128J(d) of the Social Security Act (the Act), as amended by the Affordable Care Act, that requires Medicare Parts A and B health care providers to report and return overpayments 60 days after the date an overpayment is identified, or the due date of any corresponding cost report, if applicable, whichever is later. If credible information indicates that an overpayment exists, the rule requires that a reasonably diligent inquiry must be performed.

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5 Easy Steps To Implement An ABN Into Your Practice’s Standard Procedures

April 7th, 2021 by

adding abn to your medical practiceBy: Zach Simpson

Due to the increasing number of forms being required these days it is all too common for practices to get lost in the vast terminology, rules, and coding requirements that have to be followed as well. An area that practices have one of the most difficult times with is operationalizing the issuance of an ABN properly. I am frequently asked to consult for practices that ask who does which part, when, and with whom in regards to ABNs? In other instances, many practices I have worked with simply make the mistake that they can solve the complexities of trying to understand the nuances of how to properly utilize ABNs by deciding to issue ABNs to every Medicare patient for every service which is not a viable option either. The solution that many offices try that I just described is called issuing blanket ABNs, which in turn may cause Medicare to invalidate all issued ABNs from the practice, including those that may been appropriate which is why it is very important that blanket ABNs are never issued.

One thing in common with practices that issue ABNs in a proper manner is that they all have a process in place for identifying potential denied services prior to delivering them. To many practices this may sound easy, but to ensure that your practice is as effective as possible it will take some claims data analysis to ensure that your practice is capturing all potential opportunities for ABN issuance. The aim of this article will be to provide practices with 5 steps that will make ABN issuance easier. read more

Can I Provide in-home or mobile IV Therapy?

March 24th, 2021 by

By: Chase Howard

IV hydration therapy has many applications and purposes. In the most common cases, the purpose is for post-surgery recovery or wellness optimization. IV therapy businesses that want to offer a more concierge type of service by offering mobile or in-home services, need to be aware of Florida home health agency laws and regulations.

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PLLC v. LLC: What’s The Difference?

March 24th, 2021 by

healthcare business llcBy: Chase Howard

In most cases, the limited liability company, or LLC, is the preferred business structure for a wide variety of healthcare businesses. If you’re a licensed professional, you can also use the professional limited liability company, or PLLC for your healthcare practice or business. While generally these two entity types are the same, there’s a small difference to be aware of when organizing the company.

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FMV (Fair Market Valuation) Heads Up

February 26th, 2021 by

By: Jeff Cohen

FMVs are at the heart of healthcare regulatory compliance when money or anything of value changes hands in a healthcare business setting.  Why?  Two reasons:

  1. Healthcare laws (Stark, the Anti Kickback Statute and the Patient Brokering Act) all target money changing hands in the healthcare business space; and
  2. There are clear exemptions and exceptions that have as an essential ingredient that the compensation (or pricing) is consistent with “fair market value.”

How it Goes—A Six Part Process

Locking down an externally performed FMV (part of the “gold standard” in regulatory compliance) is a process.  Here’s what it should look like:

Step 1.  The healthcare business person or his/her advisors (often accountants) find someone who specializes in performing FMVs for the specific matter (e.g. compensation, price of a business to be acquired);

Step 2.  The LAWYER for the healthcare business is immediately involved in the process BEFORE the FMV firm is engaged;

Step 3.  The LAWYER engages the FMV firm on behalf of the healthcare business client;

Step 4.  The parties (including the lawyer) get on the phone or in a meeting with the “FMV guy” and has a very extensive conversation re the project;

Step 5.  Once the FMV process done, a DRAFT FMV study is prepared and discussed interactively with the healthcare business and the lawyer;

Step 6.  Once finalized, an execution copy is prepared and provided to the lawyer. read more

Autonomous Nurse Practitioners in Private Practices

February 22nd, 2021 by

By: Chase Howard

The new autonomous practice regulations allow certain Nurse Practitioners to practice independent of physicians, without supervision, in certain settings. While we’re awaiting further declarations and definitions from the Board of Nursing as to what is including in primary care, there is already an opportunity for autonomous practice nurse practitioners to establish concierge and direct primary care offices.

The concierge practice model and the direct primary care model, however, are still regulated depending on the way patients pay. read more

Health Care Clinics Targeted For Medical Director Requirements

February 9th, 2021 by

By: Zach Simpson

There have been a rise in cases recently, in which practices that operate under a Health Care Clinic License have been brought under scrutiny by insurance companies trying to recoup funds through any means possible. In an effort to claw back funds insurance companies are beginning to claim that medical directors are failing to meet their statutory obligations under Florida Law which in turn can have serious monetary repercussions. Due to the clinics allegedly failing to meet their statutory obligations the insurance companies are filing suit to recoup any payments made while violating the Health Care Clinic Act obligations, and to stall any future payments due until such cases are heard.

By law, a medical director must be a health care practitioner that holds an active and unencumbered Florida license as a medical physician, osteopathic physician, chiropractic physician, or podiatric physician. The type of services provided at a clinic may dictate who would be able to serve as a clinic’s medical director, because a medical director must be authorized under the law to supervise all services provided at the clinic.

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How Autonomous Practice Is The Biggest Business Opportunity for 2021

January 6th, 2021 by

fhlf nurse practitioner lawBy: Chase Howard

With the passage of autonomous practice ability for nurse practitioners in Florida this year, many are wondering how this will affect the healthcare industry in Florida. In a traditional sense, rural and underserved areas should have the opportunity for growth in healthcare providers. The autonomous practice law removes restrictions on certain nurse practitioners, granting them the ability to practice in primary care practice settings without worrying about supervision restrictions. Outside of that, the application of the new law can expand healthcare business offerings and abilities. read more

What to Do When The Government Comes Knocking

January 3rd, 2021 by

business meeting between healthcare professionals and govermentBy: Karen Davila

You do everything right.  You’re careful to dot your i’s and cross your t’s.  Compliance is hard-wired because you’re in an industry that’s highly regulated and you’ve built into your operations a series of compliance checks and balances.  However, even with strong controls in place, compliance efforts sometimes fall short– and whether you’re a physician group, a pharmacy, a durable medical equipment company, a home health agency, or any other health care provider, someday you might find yourself face-to-face with law enforcement officials or regulatory enforcement authorities.  What do you do?  How do you assure the most successful outcome with minimal business disruption?

Compliance is the foundation to mitigating the risks inherent in any health care operation.  Compliance can reduce the likelihood that regulators or law enforcement suddenly appear on your doorstep.  But preparation for emergencies and uncertainties is the key to reducing the risk that non-compliance leads to lengthy business interruption.  Although you may be saying “if”, you really should be thinking and acting more like “when”.  It costs everything to be ill-prepared and it costs very little to be well-prepared.  The following preparation can prevent much of the uncertainty that arises in these cases.

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

First and foremost, make sure you have well-developed policies and procedures for what to do in such instances.  You should review these policies and procedures with your employees regularly, focusing on the importance of compliance.  Out of fear and uncertainty, employees can do things that create unnecessary challenges.  Educating them as to what their rights and responsibilities are will mitigate those risks.  Make sure your policies and procedures include the designation of who is in charge (“person in charge”) when the government does show up. read more