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Lease Considerations – Acupuncture Practices

August 20th, 2020 by

real estate lease for medical buildingBy: Chase Howard

Reviewing a lease prior signing will save you extreme headache and cost in the long run. Landlords tend to act as if they have all of the power in negotiations and will make their own rules along the way. Lease negotiations are complex and involve significant business and legal considerations.

Here are guidelines to ensuring that your lease is reasonable and fair:

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Corporate Start-Up for Acupuncturists

August 19th, 2020 by

acupuncture law in floridaBy: Chase Howard

As an Acupuncturist in a private, solo-practice or group practice, proper start-up is key. Understanding how to set up your business properly with the State and IRS, developing a business plan, and understanding all requirements will help eliminate obstacles that will slow your growth.

When working with new acupuncture businesses, consider the following:

1. Corporate Structure

a. A company is considered a legal entity and recognized by both the IRS and the State. Depending on the number of owners and type of business, different options exist regarding entity type. Specifically, most healthcare professionals choose a limited liability company, corporation or a professional association. Once you choose the appropriate type of entity, you’ll want to meet with your CPA to discuss taxation of the entity and how that affects the owners personally.

2. Obtaining an EIN/TID

a. Before you can open a business bank account, or even do business in your city, you will need to obtain an Employer Identification Number or Tax ID for your business. Properly applying will save you time down the road with IRS tax issues.

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Florida and Federal Trademarking Differences

August 10th, 2020 by

trademark lawBy: Chase Howard

In a recent article, I touched on some of the reasons to consider trademark registration and what is required. Many people hear trademarks and might think only of the Federal registration through the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). Florida, however, also offers state level registration for marks that likely won’t qualify at the Federal level.

Trademark registration grants an intellectual property rights that help its owner protect a brand’s mark, logo, name or any other way that it conveys intangible property.

Trademark protection is available under both Federal and State law. Federal trademark protection allows the brand owner to protect their trademark in interstate commerce, while Florida registration allows trademark protection for marks only in the state of Florida. Florida law does share a lot of the same concepts and requirements of the Federal trademark requirements, however is limited only to protection in the State of Florida. Florida trademarks are less expensive and easier to obtain than Federal trademarks, but are superseded by a Federal trademark registration. read more

7 Types of Business Insurances Medical Providers Should Consider

August 10th, 2020 by

business insuranceBy: Steven Boyne

Let’s Talk Insurance. Beyond Malpractice insurance, what other insurance should I consider?

Every medical provider knows that you have to buy malpractice insurance, and they generally understand why they need it.  Another policy that every business has to have is Workers Compensation for their employees.  But beyond these two policies, what else should a business consider: read more

Are You Paying TOO LITTLE in Rent?

July 31st, 2020 by

medical office space rent costBy: Douglas Hughes, (Guest Blogger from CARR)

Conventional wisdom tells us that spending less money is the most effective approach to saving money. After all, a penny saved is a penny earned and the more you save, the more you have left over. That logic is hard to argue with, but it is not always fool proof. Saving money for your practice the wrong way can lead to diminished patient care, outdated equipment, the wrong location for your practice and additional negative results.

There are several critical factors often overlooked when a healthcare practice’s primary focus is paying the lowest rent vs. achieving the best combination of overall terms. Let’s look at three factors where paying higher rent could actually increase your profitability.

#1: The Cost to Build

Healthcare buildouts often cost two-to-three times more than a typical commercial real estate space. This is attributed to many factors that are unique to healthcare, including:

  • More durable finishes
  • Millwork and cabinetry
  • Plumbing and sinks in exam rooms, sterilization centers and laboratories
  • Increased electrical and HVAC requirements (heating, ventilation and air conditioning)
  • And several more

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A Word is Worth Thousands: Protecting Your Healthcare Brand

July 22nd, 2020 by

trademark lawBy: Chase Howard

Investing in a healthcare related business involves significant time and money. Building a brand takes even more and is extremely important in today’s society. Having the ability to build a recognizable brand, scale, and potentially sell, is the goal of many healthcare business entrepreneurs. With the ever-booming impact of social media, online advertising, and online reviews, healthcare businesses seek to engage at a higher degree than ever before to attract new patients, retain current patients, and establish themselves as experts in their respective fields.

Building a brand is part of it, while protecting that brand is far more important. A well-recognized word or logo can be worth everything to your business. Obtaining ownership and protection over a name or mark is a fairly simply task with significant rewards. Trademarks are the names, slogans, tag lines, and/or logos that identify and represent your business, its services, and mission to the public, and are the foundation for the business’s overall branding and marketing. Trademarks can also be used to protect your business in a specific area or a specific area of expertise. If you do not protect your brand, a competitor could use it (or something similar, which could confuse the public and your patients and therefore potentially draw business away from your brand. read more

Personal Injury Protection (PIP) Payments for “Physical Therapy Modalities & Services” Are Not Reimbursable When Rendered by a Massage Therapist in Florida

July 19th, 2020 by

massage therapy and pipBy: Zach Simpson

You may not be aware that the Third DCA ruled earlier this year that “Physical Therapy Modalities & Services” such as electrical muscle stimulation, ultrasound, heat, ice, and traction are not reimbursable under PIP when rendered by a massage therapist in any practice setting. Pointing in part to a law that took effect January 1, 2013 an appeals court sided with Geico General Insurance Co. in a dispute about paying for physical-therapy services provided by massage therapists to auto-accident victims.

Case Details

The Miami-Dade County case involved bills for three patients sent by Beacon Healthcare Center, Inc., under the state’s personal injury protection, or PIP, insurance system.

Physical therapy and physical therapy modalities (i.e. electrical muscle stimulation, ultrasound, heat, ice, and traction) were prescribed for auto accident patients by Beacon’s treating physician and medical director which were performed by massage therapists rather than physical therapists. Neither a licensed physician nor a physical therapist directly supervised the care performed by the massage therapists. However, when Beacon billed GEICO they noted that the supervising physician, and not the massage therapists, provided treatment.  The billing statements also indicated that the massage therapists performed physical therapy modalities under the direct supervision of the medical director, whose only responsibility was to review patient files monthly. Geico General Insurance Company denied payment, which led to Beacon filing a suit in Circuit Court. read more

Florida Now Requires Written Consent for All Pelvic Exams

July 12th, 2020 by

By: David Davidson

As of July 1, 2020, all Florida health care providers, and providers in training, are now required to obtain written consent from their patients (or their legal representatives) before performing a pelvic exam.  The only exceptions to this requirement are when the exam is done pursuant to a court order, or in cases of emergency.  Given the broad application of the new law, it is imperative for any provider who may need to perform a pelvic exam on a patient, even if it’s a fairly rare occurrence, to be ready to obtain the consent.

The law grew out of concerns for improper actions taken against sedated patients.  And as initially proposed, it only covered pelvic exams performed in training settings.  However, the legislature expanded the scope to include all settings and all providers. read more

What If My Landlord Is Also My Patient?

June 30th, 2020 by

landlord as patientBy: Douglas Hughes, (Guest Blogger from CARR)

How do you handle a real estate negotiation if your landlord is also your patient?

Many healthcare tenants find themselves in this situation when approaching a lease renewal or relocation. Compounding the situation, is that most healthcare professionals are not prone to conflict or confrontation and would prefer to avoid them.  This creates a scenario where tenants want to obtain the best terms possible for their practice without upsetting their landlord and losing them as a patient.

In an ideal world, you could tell people exactly what you hope to achieve and then expect to receive a fair response. Unfortunately, commercial real estate is not one of those worlds! The difference between a properly or poorly negotiated lease or purchase contract can benefit or cost you tens to hundreds of thousands of dollars over a ten-year period. Understanding how much is really at stake during a commercial real estate negotiation changes how you should approach every transaction.

To help your perspective, look at these foundational questions: read more

Prepping Your Dental Practice for Sale

June 10th, 2020 by

dental practice sales transactionBy: Chase Howard

Thinking About Selling Your Practice? Preparation is key and the difference between a successful sale and seller’s regret.

Step 1: Call Your Financial Planner

  • Be sure that you can afford to leave the business
  • Most buyers will require a comprehensive non-compete and you should be certain that you are financially prepared to retire, sell, or move before signing any restrictions.
  • You will also want to ensure that you are planning for the income you are about to receive. Are there vehicles in place or options that are best to ensure the purchase price is put to its best use for you.
  • Consider post sale options if not retirement – are you going to be employed by the buyer? Are you selling to an associate and will phase out? Are you just moving and will need to find new employment/open a practice?

Step 2: Visit Your Accountant

  • Your business is only worth as much as can be defined on paper.
  • If a potential buyer cannot make sense of your accounts and assets, you may leave significant value on the table.
  • Get your financial history in order by reviewing tax returns, profit statements, AR reports, and payroll history for prior 3-4 years.
  • Clean up creative bookkeeping – you will have to promise the buyer that your financial statements are true and accurate.
  • Have your accountant help value assets of your business – or use an appraiser if necessary.
  • Discuss company structure – there may be restructuring needs or you may need to transition to a different structure for tax purposes.

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