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Autonomous Nurse Practitioners in Private Practices

February 22nd, 2021 by

By: Chase Howard

The new autonomous practice regulations allow certain Nurse Practitioners to practice independent of physicians, without supervision, in certain settings. While we’re awaiting further declarations and definitions from the Board of Nursing as to what is including in primary care, there is already an opportunity for autonomous practice nurse practitioners to establish concierge and direct primary care offices.

The concierge practice model and the direct primary care model, however, are still regulated depending on the way patients pay. read more

Supervision of Electrologists

February 22nd, 2021 by

By: Chase Howard

Changes are coming to the way Electrologists in Florida may be supervised when performing laser hair removal. For years, direct, on-site supervision by a physician was required in order to allow an electrologist to perform laser hair removal. Recently, the Board of Medicine and Electrolysis Council agreed to a rule change, altering the method of supervision to include telehealth. read more

A Self-Audit Checklist for Laboratories

February 9th, 2021 by

By: Dean Viskovich

The Office of Inspector General (OIG) and other Federal agencies charged with responsibility for enforcement of Federal law have emphasized the importance of voluntarily developed and implemented compliance plans.  The government, especially the OIG, has a zero- tolerance policy towards fraud and abuse and uses its extensive statutory authority to reduce fraud in Medicare and other federally funded health care programs.  The OIG believes that through a partnership with the private sector, significant reductions in fraud and abuse can be accomplished.  Compliance plans offer a vehicle to achieve that goal.  The OIG has provided a model compliance plan for clinical laboratories to assist laboratory providers in crafting and refining their own compliance plans.

The OIG suggests that the comprehensive compliance program should include the following elements:

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How Autonomous Practice Is The Biggest Business Opportunity for 2021

January 6th, 2021 by

fhlf nurse practitioner lawBy: Chase Howard

With the passage of autonomous practice ability for nurse practitioners in Florida this year, many are wondering how this will affect the healthcare industry in Florida. In a traditional sense, rural and underserved areas should have the opportunity for growth in healthcare providers. The autonomous practice law removes restrictions on certain nurse practitioners, granting them the ability to practice in primary care practice settings without worrying about supervision restrictions. Outside of that, the application of the new law can expand healthcare business offerings and abilities. read more

Recap: Dental Employment Contracts

January 6th, 2021 by

fhlf dental lawBy: Chase Howard

Many young dental professionals are presented with the opportunity to join a practice after graduation. Making an informed decision and negotiating a fair contract can be difficult but will ultimately pay dividends for years to come. Here are some items to consider when reviewing and negotiating your employment contract. read more

What to Do When The Government Comes Knocking

January 3rd, 2021 by

business meeting between healthcare professionals and govermentBy: Karen Davila

You do everything right.  You’re careful to dot your i’s and cross your t’s.  Compliance is hard-wired because you’re in an industry that’s highly regulated and you’ve built into your operations a series of compliance checks and balances.  However, even with strong controls in place, compliance efforts sometimes fall short– and whether you’re a physician group, a pharmacy, a durable medical equipment company, a home health agency, or any other health care provider, someday you might find yourself face-to-face with law enforcement officials or regulatory enforcement authorities.  What do you do?  How do you assure the most successful outcome with minimal business disruption?

Compliance is the foundation to mitigating the risks inherent in any health care operation.  Compliance can reduce the likelihood that regulators or law enforcement suddenly appear on your doorstep.  But preparation for emergencies and uncertainties is the key to reducing the risk that non-compliance leads to lengthy business interruption.  Although you may be saying “if”, you really should be thinking and acting more like “when”.  It costs everything to be ill-prepared and it costs very little to be well-prepared.  The following preparation can prevent much of the uncertainty that arises in these cases.

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

First and foremost, make sure you have well-developed policies and procedures for what to do in such instances.  You should review these policies and procedures with your employees regularly, focusing on the importance of compliance.  Out of fear and uncertainty, employees can do things that create unnecessary challenges.  Educating them as to what their rights and responsibilities are will mitigate those risks.  Make sure your policies and procedures include the designation of who is in charge (“person in charge”) when the government does show up. read more

January 1, 2021: Hospital Pricing May Not be Clear, but it Must be Transparent

December 10th, 2020 by

fhlf hospital pricing transparencyBy: David J. Davidson

On January 1, 2021, every hospital in the United States (with very few exceptions) will be required to post clear, accessible pricing information online about the items and services they provide.  These “standard charges” must be provided in two ways: first, as a comprehensive list of all items and services offered by the hospital in a machine readable format; and second, as a display of “shoppable services” in a consumer friendly format.  According to CMS, the stated goal of the new rule is to empower patients “with the necessary information to make informed health care decisions.”

With the first requirement, the list must include gross charges, discounted cash prices, payor-specific negotiated charges, and de-identified minimum and maximum negotiated charges.  The items and services covered are basically anything for which the hospital has established a standard charge, regardless of location or whether the item or service is provided on an inpatient or outpatient basis.  These include, but are not limited to, supplies, surgical implants, procedures, room and board, and professional charges.

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Weave Compliance Into Your Practice For 2021

December 8th, 2020 by

fhlf regulatory complianceBy: Jeff Cohen

A recent Department of Justice $500,000 settlement with a cardiology practice underscores the need for ensuring tighter compliance by medical practices.  There, the practice billed Medicare for cardiology procedures for which interpretive reports were also required.  Medicare paid for the procedures, but upon audit, CMS could not find the requisite interpretive reports.  The False Claims Act case settled for $500,000, but it’s likely that (1) the reimbursement by Medicare was far less, and (b) the legal fees behind the settlement weren’t too far behind the settlement amount!  Had the practice self-audited each year, would they have found the discrepancy?

Medical practices have felt the weight of price compression and regulatory load more than probably any segment in the healthcare sector.  They are doing far more for far less.  And regulations expand faster than viruses!  Hence, many have a strategy of regulatory compliance that can best be characterized as a combination of facial compliance (“We bought the manual and put it on the shelf”) and hope (“They’re not really serious about this, are they?”).  Unless you’re part of a practice of more than 20 doctors, it’s likely that you can do more to ensure regulatory compliance.

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Healthcare Marketing: Measure Twice, Cut Once

December 3rd, 2020 by

fhlf healthcare marketingBy: Jeff Cohen

Wanna know how often we’re asked whether the laws re healthcare marketing are really enforced?  How often we hear “Everyone is doing it.”  “Surely they [regulators] understand that every healthcare business has to market its services and item,” we’re told.  And when we start to educate people re the state and federal laws that pertain to marketing healthcare items and services (INCLUDING those for which payment isn’t made by a state or federal healthcare program), their impatience and intolerance is palpable.

Take a look at the latest report from the Department of Justice guilty plea from someone who marketed the services of a genetic testing lab.  He admitted being guilty of receiving over $300K in kickback money (presumably in the form of marketing fees) and now faces (1) a $250K fine, (2) returning all the money he received, and (3) five years in prison!

Marketing any healthcare service or item is at the tip of the sword in terms of regulatory investigation and enforcement.  It’s that simple.  And so when your lawyers drag you through laws like the Anti-Kickback Statute, the Florida Patient Brokering Act, the federal health insurance fraud law, the bona fide employee exception, the personal services arrangement and management contract safe harbor and EKRA, thank them!  And expect nothing less.  If you do ANYTHING at all in the neighborhood of marketing a healthcare item or services, the first place to start is:  meet with a very experienced healthcare lawyer who is not learning on your dime.  And have them take a couple hours to educate you about the laws, the options and the risks of each one.  And once you’ve done that, ask them what more you can do to reduce your risk, for instance— read more

Not All Florida Healthcare Lawyers Are Created Equally

November 25th, 2020 by

Florida healthcare lawIf you are a medical provider or facility and need the best legal advice for your business, contact the experienced teammate Florida Healthcare Law Firm and see why our florida healthcare lawyers go above and beyond the average legal team.

If you are a doctor, dentist, pharmacist or medical provider and you need legal advice that also makes good business sense, then you should never settle for a cookie cutter team of attorneys that simply dabbles in generic cases. You need experts with laser-beam focus on medicine and how it interacts with finance. You need the pros at Florida Healthcare Law Firm. Our florida healthcare lawyers don’t accept mediocre results. We guarantee success because of our collective experience—150 years of specialization in medicine. And our results get noticed. Eight prestigious awards can’t be wrong. We aren’t your average firm. Our accolades and distinctive rankings in some of the country’s most prestigious legal firm listings include Legal Elite, AV Preeminent—the highest peer ranked level of professional excellence, communication skills and ethics. Our reputation is sterling among our colleagues and our clients.

So you may be wondering: if our focus is exclusively medicine, is our menu of services narrow? Not at all. Here’s what we can help you navigate: payor issues, technology and medical devices, hiring and termination, compliance and audits, telehealth and telemedicine, business operations, business transactions (including start-ups), dental, pharmaceutical and acupuncture. Florida healthcare law can be complicated. Don’t go it alone. We have the team that will sit with you and tailor our meetings to suit your needs alone. We’re guided by a mission that’s rooted in honesty, humility, accountability, passion, creativity, value and even fun in a friendly office atmosphere where we know every client’s name. Yes, we can turn even the most challenging complex issues into educational experiences that will help you make better business decisions in the future. With exceptional customer service and 24/7 response, our professionals will respond. Don’t wait until your small business problems become large issues that could compromise the integrity of your practice and your career. Hire Florida Healthcare Law Firm today.