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Autonomous Nurse Practitioners in Private Practices

February 22nd, 2021 by

By: Chase Howard

The new autonomous practice regulations allow certain Nurse Practitioners to practice independent of physicians, without supervision, in certain settings. While we’re awaiting further declarations and definitions from the Board of Nursing as to what is including in primary care, there is already an opportunity for autonomous practice nurse practitioners to establish concierge and direct primary care offices.

The concierge practice model and the direct primary care model, however, are still regulated depending on the way patients pay. read more

How Autonomous Practice Is The Biggest Business Opportunity for 2021

January 6th, 2021 by

fhlf nurse practitioner lawBy: Chase Howard

With the passage of autonomous practice ability for nurse practitioners in Florida this year, many are wondering how this will affect the healthcare industry in Florida. In a traditional sense, rural and underserved areas should have the opportunity for growth in healthcare providers. The autonomous practice law removes restrictions on certain nurse practitioners, granting them the ability to practice in primary care practice settings without worrying about supervision restrictions. Outside of that, the application of the new law can expand healthcare business offerings and abilities. read more

First Steps for APRN’s When Opening an Autonomous Primary Care Practice

November 17th, 2020 by

fhlf aprn autonomous practiceBy: Chase Howard

In another article, we provided an update to the autonomous practice law for Nurse Practitioners in Florida. For NP’s that qualify, that means they can open a primary care practice without a supervising physician. For most, that means learning about opening and operating a company. Here’s what that entails:

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APRN Requirements for Autonomous Practice

November 14th, 2020 by

fhlf aprn requirementsBy: Chase Howard

Florida is the latest state to expand the practice of Advanced Practice Registered Nurses. In March 2020, autonomous practice was passed and signed into law, with the law going into effect in July. In October, the Board of Nursing promulgated rules and provided the application for NP’s seeking to practice autonomously.

Before qualifying for autonomous practice, however, an NP must meet the following requirements:

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Florida APRN Independent Practice Update

July 3rd, 2020 by

APRN independent practiceBy: Chase Howard

In March, the Florida Legislature passed multiple bills that would allow advanced practice registered nurses (APRN) to practice independently of physicians in the delivery of primary care practice. The law, however, went into full effect on July 1. Still, the law did not automatically grant autonomous practice to all nurse practitioners. Rather, an application process is still needed, as well as final regulations governing the new law.

In June, the Florida Board of Nursing voted to move forward with the drafting of rules and the application process to be designated as an independent practice Nurse Practitioner. This process usually takes three months to complete before it is open for practitioners to apply. The Board also voted to define “primary care practice” to include “health promotion, disease prevention, health maintenance, counseling, patient education, and diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illnesses in a variety of healthcare settings.”

Until final rules are decided, a nurse practitioner will at least need to meet the following requirements: read more

Breaking News – State Surgeon General Issues Order 20-007 May 9th

May 11th, 2020 by

florida breaking healthcare news on controlled substancesBy: Susan St. John

In my last post, I promised to keep you updated as to any new orders from the State Surgeon General that would further extend a practitioner’s ability to prescribe refills of non-malignant pain controlled substances using telehealth communications, or a qualified physician’s ability to recertify an existing qualified patient’s use of medical marijuana. The Surgeon General has extended the ability to continue assisting patients with these specific needs (as well as other needs) until May 31, 2020, through the issuance of Emergency Order 20-007 on May 9, 2020.

Keep in mind, that to prescribe a refill of a controlled substance for chronic non-malignant pain, the practitioner must be an MD, DO, APRN, or PA licensed in Florida and designated as a controlled substance prescribing practitioner. Further, to prescribe such controlled substances using telehealth communications during this public health emergency, the patient must be an existing patient of the prescribing practitioner. read more

What Nurse Practitioner Practice Expansion Means for Doctors

March 27th, 2020 by

nurse practitioner practiceBy: Jeff Cohen

The issue of scope of practice is front and center in Florida right now with the expansion of what nurse practitioners (and nurse midwives) are legally permitted to do.  The newly enacted 464.0123 allows for qualified APRNs (there is specific criteria) to practice independent of a supervising physician in the following areas of medicine–primary care, family medicine, general pediatrics, and general internal medicine.

Even more, assuming they meet the membership criteria for admission to a healthcare facility medical staff, they may admit patients, manage patient care, and discharge patients.  One of the only preserved connections with a physician established by the law is if the APRN practices at a healthcare facility, a transfer agreement including a physician is required.  Additionally, the new law establishes a Council On Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Autonomous Practice, two members of which are appointed by the Board of Medicine and an additional two appointed by the Board of Osteopathic Medicine.       read more

Solution or Problem? Depends Who You Ask. New Changes to Supervision Laws Guaranteed to Make Waves In Healthcare Industry.

March 12th, 2020 by

New changes to supervision laws for APRNs advanced practice registered nurseBy: Chase Howard

After more than a year of debate, edits, tabling and lobbying, the Florida Legislature passed multiple bills that would allow advanced practice registered nurses (APRN) to practice independently of physicians, as well as authorize certain pharmacists to test and treat patients for the flu and strep throat, among other conditions.

Prior to passage of these bills, APRNs were required to have some level of physician supervision in order to practice. While in many cases direct supervision is not required, Florida law required that an APRN enter into a supervisory relationship with a Florida licensed physician. Specifically, the providers must draft written protocols regarding scope of practice, as well as provide certain notices to their governing boards and patients. While the requirements vary based on the type of practice, they aren’t difficult to comply with in most cases. Finding a supervising physician outside of that physician’s primary practice, however, might prove to be more difficult than it seems. The requirements also carry certain mileage restrictions, prohibiting supervision outside mile limits based on the level and type of supervision.

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